The Coming Serverless Everything Future

There’s the old expression that goes ‘you can’t stop progress’, and often times the digital world and advances in it are the best examples of how this tends to be true. Cloud computing really has become an unstoppable force, and the way we’re seeing the entire digital world conforming to the new realities its ushering in isn’t something that’s going change.

It’s always good to move into some ‘new’ things with caution, but there’s nothing that warrants not embracing the cloud as much as we can. Or at least that seems to be the overarching mindset of the majority of engineers and the influential decision makers that decide where their expertise is directed.

Now we’re not developers here at 4GoodHosting, but like any other quality Canadian web hosting provider we do take an interest in the major structural building blocks that make the digital world go around, and continue to make it so that the people we provide with solid and reliable web hosting are able to get more out of their interests – whatever those interests may be.

Redefining Serverless

Serverless was once a handy platform that saved you from having to size server resources correctly, plus removing resources when no longer needed. Nowadays though it’s a catchall that will have a different meaning depending on its applications and the specifics of who’s providing serverless as a service on the public clouds.

Now there’s not a systems engineer alive that’s not familiar with Kubernetes. It has become the nearly default open source container cluster and orchestration platform, and eventually seeing it go serverless was pretty much a given. Features such as networking, service discovery, scaling and cluster & container federation multi cloud support are the benefits we’re likely to see start making real impacts soon—and every one fo them is serverless enabled.

Serverless for Statefulness

The idea of statefulness may not receive the best reception with newer developers, but serverless does support statefulness. Some may continue to see them a principally incompatible, given that serverless systems execute a serverless function in a stateless manner.

However, that’s not going to be accurate.

Keep in mind that many applications – including ones moving from traditional systems – leverage state. Although most of the time stateful applications could not be ported to emerging serverless platforms, what’s emerging now seems to be a real change in direction. We can foresee many more applications moving to serverless than industry insiders would have expected. Many of the serverless technology limitations we dealt with just a few years ago are not limitations of any sort anymore.

Those familiar with devOps will know that Gitops is built as a version-control system. The plan is for Gitops to improve operational workflows and contribute to projects being more agile. The integration between Gitops, serverless Kubernetes, and even functions-as-a-service will provide benefits the industry hasn’t even been able to imagine yet, and these systems will be public cloud-based for the most part.

The Consensus on Serverless

The integration of serverless approaches and databases is already well underway and will only pick up speed this year and next. If you read up on what industry experts foresee with regards to all this, the consensus is that most enterprises will only accept a serverless approach to databases within two years’ time.

There’s the old expression that goes ‘you can’t stop progress’, and often times the digital world and advances in it are the best examples of how this tends to be true. Cloud computing really has become an unstoppable force, and the way we’re seeing the entire digital world conforming to the new realities its ushering in isn’t something that’s going change.

It’s always good to move into some ‘new’ things with caution, but there’s nothing that warrants not embracing the cloud as much as we can. Or at least that seems to be the overarching mindset of the majority of engineers and the influential decision makers that decide where their expertise is directed.

Now we’re not developers here at 4GoodHosting, but like any other quality Canadian web hosting provider we do take an interest in the major structural building blocks that make the digital world go around, and continue to make it so that the people we provide with solid and reliable web hosting are able to get more out of their interests – whatever those interests may be.

Redefining Serverless

Serverless was once a handy platform that saved you from having to size server resources correctly, plus removing resources when no longer needed. Nowadays though it’s a catchall that will have a different meaning depending on its applications and the specifics of who’s providing serverless as a service on the public clouds.

Now there’s not a systems engineer alive that’s not familiar with Kubernetes. It has become the nearly default open source container cluster and orchestration platform, and eventually seeing it go serverless was pretty much a given. Features such as networking, service discovery, scaling and cluster & container federation multi cloud support are the benefits we’re likely to see start making real impacts soon—and every one fo them is serverless enabled.

Serverless for Statefulness

The idea of statefulness may not receive the best reception with newer developers, but serverless does support statefulness. Some may continue to see them a principally incompatible, given that serverless systems execute a serverless function in a stateless manner.

However, that’s not going to be accurate.

Keep in mind that many applications – including ones moving from traditional systems – leverage state. Although most of the time stateful applications could not be ported to emerging serverless platforms, what’s emerging now seems to be a real change in direction. We can foresee many more applications moving to serverless than industry insiders would have expected. Many of the serverless technology limitations we dealt with just a few years ago are not limitations of any sort anymore.

Those familiar with devOps will know that Gitops is built as a version-control system. The plan is for Gitops to improve operational workflows and contribute to projects being more agile. The integration between Gitops, serverless Kubernetes, and even functions-as-a-service will provide benefits the industry hasn’t even been able to imagine yet, and these systems will be public cloud-based for the most part.

The Consensus on Serverless

The integration of serverless approaches and databases is already well underway and will only pick up speed this year and next. If you read up on what industry experts foresee with regards to all this, the consensus is that most enterprises will only accept a serverless approach to databases within two years’ time.

Along with that many other serverless trends will emerge as well, as cloud technology providers attempt to make their technology buzzword compliant. We’re only just scratching the surface of what the core value of cloud technology makes possible, and the problems it will be able to solve will be seen to in an ideally pragmatic way if the current swell continues and the right type of foresight is applied.

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